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RE: Open Source and community first

in #community2 months ago

there's a lot of projects and people behind them who are thinking short term instead of long term

Thinking long term does not help, unless there is a definitive plan on what are going to be delivered - every long term must consist of clear break up of shorter milestones and commitment around that. Talking long term without definitive plan is useless.

The DHF and open source. These two go hand in hand because if you're going to ask for funding from the DHF you're going to want to have the project be open source in case something happens along the way. This is the trust factor.

Well, Open source definitely helps in the trust factor, but getting the DHF may not be directly related to that. There could be a good open source project, but still not got DHF. I have heard that its because of interest of large stake holders, and only those get funded, who have some kind of association with them ?

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I have heard that its because of interest of large stake holders, and only those get funded, who have some kind of association with them ?

Not sure where you "heard" that, but it's utter BS. I'm one of the largest stakeholders, and I don't have an association with any of the currently funded projects. The only DHF project that BlockTrades (or me personally) received any funding for was the image server proposal (50K HBD). There was also a 3K proposal by @therealwolf to create FontAwesome icons for Hive, but I only acted as a payment agent for that, I didn't keep funds associated with it.

Why blocktrades don't work?

And open-source is usually one of my key criteria for voting. Even among currently voted in proposals, you'll find that my vote isn't typically on the closed source ones. @acidyo brings up one of the most important reasons for that: the effort on a closed source project is often totally lost if the developers abandon the project and no one else can continue it.

I definitely agree with that.

I'm also highly in favour of open-sourcing, but I'd say it's a balancing act between how much value the project provides to Hive and how certain it is that it won't just be abandoned (i.e. is it just code or is there a real company behind it?).

Imagine Splinterlands would have asked for funding, them open-sourcing their files could have made it difficult to prevent copy-cats from popping up. Code is still intellectual property and I personally wouldn't release it unless the position of my company/project is established & secure.